Frank Iero & The Patience

Live: Frank Iero and the Patience – Rescue Rooms, 16/10/17

Dutch three-piece Paceshifters were first up on the bill with their energetic alt-rock anthems being belted out at the ever-filling venue. Despite being first up, the band has been going longer than any of the other projects by a considerable margin but that hasn’t made them look tired; brothers Paul and Seb Dokman co-fronting the show brings a warm connection with not only each other but with the audience, and a portion of the audience fell in love with the fraternity all three members seemed to have onstage. Drummer Jesper Albers is by no means the odd-one-out alongside the siblings either – his hard-hitting drumbeats and phenomenal energy showed off he was the best drummer of the night’s bill. Finishing off with a guest appearance from The Patience guitarist Evan Nestor to play a Nirvana cover A punchy and momentum-building tour for them, no doubt. [8/10]

Paceshifters Patience

Next up, bringing his stripped-down stage show to the UK stage was Derek Zanetti (better known as The Homeless Gospel Choir) who possesses unique stage presence which just makes every member of the audience feel at ease with his style and grace. Very much the US Frank Turner in terms of song-style, his recorded music varies from acoustic to full-band but his stage show is an incredibly vulnerable, heart-on-his-sleeve affair with breaks mid-song to talk to the crowd. The stop-start nature is anything but a disappointment though, and it felt like he became a friend to every audience member watching on in his time onstage performing songs largely from his latest album The Homeless Gospel Choir Presents: Normal. A fantastic talent with some very poignant opinions and stories to share, someone to never miss if he’s touring. [9/10]

Homeless Gospel Choir Patience

Punk frontman Dave Hause may have only been with The Mermaid as a band since February, but the last show on the tour before he departed was his 111th of the year with them – not bad going for a new band. The diversity in his catalogue was evident throughout with some songs having hints of Bryan Adams in them and others being far more middle-of-the-road rock and roll styling, but Hause‘s frontman capabilities are completely evident throughout every single song. His display of Rickenbacker, Gibson and Nash guitars showed his experience and commitment to the road after all these years, and storming through songs from each of his solo albums proved his songwriting prowess. Dedicating fan-favourite Dirty Fucker to Donald Trump proved popular, but not as popular as him giving out free shirts throughout the song because he didn’t want to take them back home to the US. A cover of Tom Petty seemed a fitting tribute as members of The Patience came out to make a giant supergroup of the two bands. A classy set from a band that will definitely make their name on the road with ease if they choose to stick together as The Mermaid. [9/10]

Dave Hause The Mermaid The Patience

Now infamous in his own right after 2 stellar albums and fresh of the back of his first EP, Frank Iero and his band The Patience came out to a lot of excited fans and immediately broke into World Destroyer to kick off one of the best punk rock sets Nottingham has seen in recent years. The no-holds-barred, sing-scream-shout blend of Frank’s vocals brings the level of excitement through the roof and the backing of long-time guitarist Evan Nestor brings a stage chemistry to rival many of the biggest bands in the world right now. A The Replacements cover with Dave Hause and a rendition of The Beatles‘ Helter Skelter threw some proof of their cultured influences (as if they needed the proof anyway), and the emotional performance of Best Friends Forever proved a set highlight – a song cowritten with his daughters back in 2014. Between songs, the chats with the crowd and accepting beers from the crowd just demonstrates Frank is one of the last true punk rockers onstage in 2017 –  a sad reality but he is keeping the breed alive. Fantastic set from a fantastic band, The Patience are one of the most exciting touring bands right now. [9/10]

Frank Iero & The Patience

Blessthefall

Live: Blessthefall – Rescue Rooms, Nottingham 30/9/17

In terms of live performance, The Five Hundred are a total throwback. Complete with 8 string guitars and 5 string bass, the dance moves are somewhat reminiscent of a 2009 crab-filled Attack Attack! set. That’s where the similarities end though; guitarists Mark Byrne and Paul Doughty put together some fantastic chugging riffs and slick leads which combine with the thumping bass and drums for a real suckerpunch sound.

Unfortunately, the boxy and untreated venue didn’t do much for the heavy tones of the locals; frontman John Eley’s vocals were often lost in the somewhat sludgy sound bounding around the room to the extent that it looked as if he was forcing himself to go louder in parts in order to be heard. That aside, a solid set from good local talent. [6/10]

Harrogate natives Blood Youth were the touring support on this run, bringing their melodic hardcore mania to the Rescue Rooms stage. Well-experienced in playing their debut full-length Beyond Repair by now since its release in April, the heavy verses blew the audience away as is the custom of the three-piece. A better set of tonal settings allowed each band member to cut through the sludgy sound in the venue and despite some microphone issues while walking out onto the stage, frontman Kaya Tarsus put on a phenomenal show.

It’s rare to have someone who has fantastic clean vocals as well as screams and even more rare for them to be backed up by musicians who can also sing, but all three permanent members can harmonise and take over each other’s parts seamlessly; drummer Sam Hallett doing a line in the chorus of I Remember to allow Kaya to breathe indicating the seamless transitioning.

In the middle of the set, Tarsus informed the crowd about filming a video for the self-proclaimed “hesviest Blood Youth song” Parasite, which got the full response it deserved. A great crowd reaction throughout for the band, proving they are one of the best touring bands right now, period. [9/10]

Headliners Blessthefall were last up to work their magic for the Nottingham audience, which perfectly did the job of topping off the night. Having the two vocalists allows Blessthefall an opportunity of having the depth in both vocalists’ voices to do each half immaculately, but having the designated frontman being the clean vocalist in a heavy band means Beau Bokan can move around a lot more – he spent nigh-on half the show in the crowd giving high-fives and hugs.

Ploughing through tracks old and new only showed off Bokan’s vocal abilities, combining with Jared’s screams (also immaculate throughout the set) and Eric’s silky-smooth leads led to a melody/aggression combination that was backed up with the rhythm section to a T. A fantastic set from a band who seem to have a lot to prove over the next couple of years. [8/10]

See some fan-filmed footage of 2015 album track Dead Air performed on Saturday:

Better Than Never

Live: Better Than Never – The Black Heart, Camden 14/8/17

Taking to the stage first was Midlands acoustic man Luke Rainsford who brought in a fair crowd considering he was first up and had come a long way. Opening with Home Safe, Luke played through material from both of his full length albums with aplomb as he always does, blowing away both fans and first timers alike with his honest lyrics and catchy hooks. Closing with his personal favourite track FrameLuke looked as though he was going to cry as he screamed out “I know that I’ll never learn” to an already emotional crowd as the cathartic close to a set that always seems to short from his restrictions – just about the only criticism that can be made about his live shows. [9/10]

Better Than Never

ICYMI took to the stage in the difficult situation of following Rainsford, but the energy and vocal ability of frontwoman Elin Allan stood them in good stead for the set to follow. Playing through their tracks proved to be fairly hit and miss up to their cover of NSYNC‘s Bye Bye Bye (yes, really) which turned the whole set around. The version featured heavy guitars and the attitude of Allan shining through to sweeten the crowd up before finishing with their single Get Out to finish off the set. The band have big things coming towards the end of this year, so keep an eye out – they’re one for the future. [7/10]

Better Than Never

As the only local band of the night, pop punkers All These Years took to the stage. It appeared throughout that the band weren’t particularly well known among the onlookers but pretty quickly gained some fans with their more punk-influenced tracks as they hopped about the stage being generally offensive in the best possible way. Playing through the material from both EPs and latest single What Was Left UnsaidAll These Years put life into what was previously a fairly still crowd, perfectly filling their role as a support for the show. [8/10]

Better Than Never

Coming off the back of their debut EP release a couple of weeks ago, touring newcomers Maypine were absolutely filled with confidence hitting the Camden attic’s stage. They played through the EP’s five tracks with a couple of additional originals, but the real gem in the set was their emo rendition of Fix You by Coldplay which they released back in July (if you’re curious, listen here). The set was filled with enthusiasm, talent and hope – qualities that can are lacking in a lot of new touring bands, which are virtually never captured in the same capacity as Maypine have them. [9/10]

Better Than Never

Finishing up the night came Better Than Never who, surprisingly, drew less of a crowd than Maypine though the remaining audience were the rowdiest of the night by some margin. Blasting through both EPs, frontman James Harris bounced around with no visible intention of slowing down as he hyped up the crowd. Later, some growls mid-song produced a few looks of confusion from those not fully aware of Forty Eight from the band’s latest collection Head Under Water as they expected more pop punk tracks, but that didn’t subtract from any enjoyment on anyone’s faces. Towards the end of the set, Luke Rainsford was floating around the front of the crowd making gestures before he (somewhat unsurprisingly) made another appearance to duet Panama with Harris. A good performance to round off the night. [8/10]

Better Than Never  

counterparts servant you're not you anymore

Counterparts release single ‘No Servant of Mine’

With their latest album due out later this year, Canadian hardcore band Counterparts have released their latest single. It is titled No Servant of Mine and has a video out to accompany it, which you can watch below. The album itself is their third full-length which is due out on 22nd September, titled You’re Not You Anymore.

Vocalist Brendan Murphy said of the track: “No Servant is about relationships failing  whether they be romantic, platonic or business oriented. One way or another, the connection between two or more people is gone and we have to carry on knowing that it may be for the better. The song is my way of saying ‘If you no longer care, then go. You don’t need to stay because you owe me nothing.'”

Watch the video of No Servant of Mine here:

Catch them playing these dates with Napoleon and Polar:

11th November Patterns, Brighton, UK
12th November Clwb Ifor Bach, Cardiff, UK
13th November Vintage Bar, Doncaster, UK
14th November Rescue Rooms, Nottingham, UK
15th November G2, Glasgow, UK
16th November Rebellion, Manchester, UK
17th November Think Tank, Newcastle, UK
18th November The Dome, London, UK
19th November Joiners, Southampton, UK
21st November Patronaat, Haarlem, Holland
22nd November Lux, Hanover, Germany
23rd November Poglos, Warsaw, Poland
24th November Firlej, Wroclaw, Poland
25th Durer Kert, Budapest, Hungary

Earl Grey – The Times You Cross My Mind

Looking at the cover of Earl Grey‘s latest release, one might wonder if such a band name holds much meaning other than a penchant for hot beverages. All jokes aside, Monchengladbach, Germany’s very own Earl Grey are a band who have surely been treading the hard-worn path to success. Two EP’s down, the band followed these releases with 8000km’s worth of European touring and a slew of success on their home-turf’s DIY punk rock scene. With latest release The Times You Cross My Mind being mastered by Seb Barlow (Neck Deep, As It Is, WSTR), the band look to garner further acclaim within the wider musical community.

The EP opens with 1 minute 37 seconds of adulterated melodic hardcore joy. Nothing bursts out of the speakers, the track revolving around a series of muscular, soaring guitar parts which back vocalist Malte Unnasch’s Comeback Kid-like vocal approach. Never Sleep connects seamlessly with the opener with chugging fury and features gang vocals aplenty. The band don’t particularly take an original approach here, treading the same lines as band’s like The Story So Far, but it’s the sheer force of delivery both from Unnasch and the rest of the band that make them such an irresistible prospect.

The production locks everything in tightly with snappy drums underpinning both the rhythmic and melodic elements well. These elements shine bright on the faster tracks such as Hollow which begins with classic hardcore vehemence before shifting into half-time grooves with minimum effort. Even on the slower moments such as the stomping Snake Hips the band still don’t let up despite offering some beautiful guitar lines ala early Alexisonfire, giving the EP a little room to breathe before kicking into the next belter.

The third EP for the German crew is easily a defining moment in their short career. It pulses with vibrancy and despite this essentially being a modern hardcore record, the songs on offer are just so darn catchy that there is a good chance of seeing them supporting some of the scene leaders in the coming year. Although The Times You Cross My Mind will be many listeners first time hearing Earl Grey,  the band are unquestionably worth every second of your time.

The Times You Cross My Mind is released on the 16th July.

Jack The Envious – In Your Own Way

Jack The Envious are a London quartet formed, interestingly enough, during core members Nir Perlman and Guy Avnon’s respective military service. After recruiting bassist Guy Checkarov, the band set out to combine their experiences in the forces and band life, distilling it down to produce debut EP Pull You Down. Since the EP’s release, it would seem the band have sought to push themselves, combining punk stylings and a post-hardcore rush for maximum impact. With a string of successful local shows, the band is all set to release their sophomore EP In Your Own Way.

Straight off the bat, the band embrace a dark atmosphere with pulsing synths and music box sounds ascending before they kick in with Shut It Off. It’s a fine start to the EP with a tectonic opening riff, coming across with the same snarling energy that My Chemical Romance embraced on their first couple of records. Single Begging For More starts with choppy acoustics before the songs signature riff makes way for a hooky chorus, vocalist Perlman sounding like a hybrid of The Used’s Bert McCracken and The Movielife’s Vinnie Caruana.

The mix on the EP is strong, the guitars sitting well and creating memorable, anthemic parts and also huge backdrops for Perlman’s snarling vocal jabs. This is demonstrated no better than on the thunderous Guilty which comes complete with a stomping breakdown section and Letlive-esque spoken word part which helps set the song apart from formulaic hardcore structure.

The album closes things off with Never Look Down which is possibly the strongest offering here. The track builds from its ethereal intro and goes onto incorporate the best parts of the record, including huge reverberant guitar lines, gutsy vocals and another huge chorus. As only the second offering from Jack The Envious,  In Your Own Way makes it clear that the band are determined to prove themselves as unique commodity of the British music scene. They stand to make their mark with this dynamic and energetic EP.

2018’s EMP Persistance Tour Lineup Revealed

With summer rolling around, plenty of winter tours are being announced in the UK and Europe. Just announced is EMP Persistance‘s 2018 tour which plays out between the 18th and 28th of January. The line-up this year consists of Hatebreed, Madball, Terror, Power Trip, Broken Teeth and Insanity Alert. Tickets go on-sale at 10am Monday BST and O2 pre-sale is 10am on Saturday. Tickets available here.

Madball kick off a UK tour this week beginning in London:

25th – London, Camden Underworld

26th – Cardiff, Clwb Ifor Bach

27th – Huddersfield, The Parish

28th – Glasgow, The Garage G2

29th – Birmingham, Mama Roux

counterparts servant you're not you anymore

Counterparts Announce New Album

Melodic-hardcore band Counterparts have announced that their upcoming 3rd album titled You’re Not You Anymore will be released on 22nd September via Pure Noise Records. In anticipation of this the band have released a new single, check out Bouquet below:

“YNYA is the perfect blend of every record we’ve released prior. I feel like we did a great job at capturing the best parts of Counterparts. Not to sound like a broken record, but these are definitely the coolest songs we’ve ever written. I really do hope you enjoy it. If not, I’m sorry and I guess we’ll try harder next time.” – Brendan Murphy, vocals

You’re Not You Anymore Track List:

1. Walk Away Slowly

2. Bouquet

3.Arms Like Teeth

4. No Servant of Mine

5.  Haunt Me

6. Swim Beneath My Skin

7.Thieves

8. Rope

9. A Memory Misread

10. Fragile Limbs

11. You’re Not You Anymore

 

The band will return to the UK and Europe later this year with Napoleon and Polar in tow at the following dates:

11th November Patterns, Brighton, UK

12th November Clwb Ifor Bach, Cardiff, UK

13th November Vintage Bar, Doncaster, UK

14th November Rescue Rooms, Nottingham, UK

15th November G2, Glasgow, UK

16th November Rebellion, Manchester, UK

17th November Think Tank, Newcastle, UK

18th November The Dome, London, UK

19th November Joiners, Southampton, UK

21st November Patronaat, Harlem, Holland

22nd November Lux, Hanover, Germany

23rd November Poglos, Warsaw, Poland

24th November Firlej, Wroclaw, Poland

25th Durer Kert, Budapest, Hungary

casey butserfest

Interview: Casey, Slam Dunk South 29/5/17

Following their hugely exciting Slam Dunk set (see the review here), we caught up with Tom Weaver, frontman of one of the most promising upcoming British bands out there right now – Casey.

How’s your weekend been so far?
Tom: It’s been really good actually. I managed to catch a couple of bands today which was cool, I was doing merch all day yesterday and at Midlands.

Have you got any good stories from the weekend so far?
Tom: Yesterday, I’d just finished watching The Bronx and I was walking down to Shikari and a guy grabbed me and told me “ska music is exclusively for paedophiles and magicians” and that was it. He just wandered off.

What would you put in a Casey cocktail? (It doesn’t have to be alcoholic)
Tom: Yeah I’ll take you up on that. No alcohol and no caffeine so… I have to be honest, it would probably just be tropical Sunny D.

What’s been your highlight of 2017 so far?
Tom: There have been a few really. Impericon festival in Leipzig is at the top – that was the biggest show we’ve ever played by a considerable margin. That was our first experience of a real festival too, plus meeting the guys in Thy Art Is Murder was cool too. I’ve been a fan of them for a long time so meeting them finally was greit, and on top of that them being so incredibly humble and really nice people was a huge thing. Other than that I think getting feedback on the record has been good, hearing different people’s interpretations on it and everything.

Who would you like to support or support you in the near future?
Tom: There are a load of bands we’ve said we’d love to play with like LydiaPianos Become The TeethTouche Amore…  In terms of smaller bands to support us, we love Movements so if we could sort something with them that would be great. Our friends in Holding Absence obviously, we’ve been trying to sort something out with them for a while so hopefully that will come soon. This year has really opened us up to touring with bands outside our genre and style so that’s always an option again. We all caught Citizen this weekend and thought they’d be awesome to play with so…

How do you feel Casey has changed since we saw you at Butserfest last year?
Tom: Nothing’s really changed, exactly. When we’re on the stage it’s very self-enclosed so the way we performed at Impericon for 8,000 people and the way we performed to a couple of hundred in the rain at Butserfest. Obviously we’ve seen an incremental increase in fan interaction since back then, and today was a perfect example of that. I think that was the first time I’ve ever been able to fully step away from the mic and hear the crowd back which was insane. Other than that, it’s just the gradual spread of fans week on week. We’ll have a look and see a few more in Australia and a few in America picking up on us so the organic increase of the fanbase is cool, but nothing has changed as a band exactly.

Which direction do you see your music going next?
Tom: We’ve never sat down and had a conversation about how we want to sound. Everything we’ve written up to now has been a product of improvisation really so we’ll go to a practice room and see. Sometimes someone has come up with something and say “I wrote this at home, I think it sounds cool”, sometimes someone plays something and we’ll say “keep playing that, I’ll just try this” and it builds. Whether it becomes an interlude in the live set or if it becomes a complete song we don’t know until we’ve built it. We’ve never decided we want to be a post-hardcore band or a post-rock band or a we want to write eleven really atmospheric songs, we just write how we feel. We’ve been messing with some pieces that might become a record but in three or four months’ time we might decide we’re not really fans of that anymore and do something else. What we’ve been doing is more of the same in a way, but more mature. A lot more thought is going into the layering and how we can fill a room with it because of the different shows we’re starting to play now. There are points in big shows like Impericon where about a minute of the set was lost in translation because of the acoustics of the bigger rooms.

 

Thanks to Tom for chatting to us! Casey are a band increasing in size and following rapidly so get on with immersing yourself in their recordings and live shows now to follow their monumental rise that’s just around the corner…